Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine:

So how can you relieve or totally heal pain and illness without being concerned about the harmful side effects of prescribed medicine? Even death? One of the safest, most effective, non-toxic, non- invasive healing systems ever developed are acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, known as TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine)or Oriental Medicine. Developed in the Far East over 2500 years ago, acupuncture is a holistic form of medicine that focuses on keeping the body’s life energy (called Qi – pronounced “chee”) balanced.

HARDLY A DAY PASSES THAT ANOTHER DOCTOR-PRESCRIBED PAIN RELIEVER ISN’T RECALLED OR CALLED INTO QUESTION

So how can you relieve or totally heal pain and illness without being concerned about the harmful side effects of prescribed medicine? Even death?

One of the safest, most effective, non-toxic, non-invasive healing systems ever developed are acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, known as TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine)or Oriental Medicine.

Developed in the Far East over 2500 years ago, acupuncture is a holistic form of medicine that focuses on keeping the body’s life energy (called Qi – pronounced “chee”) balanced.

When the Qi becomes unbalanced, illness and/or pain occur. Its causes?

• Poor nutrition

• Stress and anxiety

• Infections

• Toxins

• Trauma

• Weather conditions

A combined program of acupuncture, TCM and moving meditation exercises known, as Qigong, treat both body and mind, restoring the patient’s balance and health.

The history of acupuncture dates back about 2000 years. It was first developed and practiced in China, although over the last two millennia Korean, Japanese and South East Asian variants of the practice were created.

Some people are afraid of acupuncture because they dread needles. Although acupuncture is performed with what are called needles, they are ultra-thin, delicate and rarely do you feel even a pin prick because they hardly penetrate the skin.

Needles are strategically placed by trained acupuncturists in points or other areas that have been mapped out and clinically tested by over 60 generations of Asian physicians.


Despite its long history, Oriental medicine is supported by modern research and education. Today, before an acupuncturist can be licensed in the Garden State, he or she must complete a 4-year bachelor’s degree, followed by 3 to 4 years of training leading to a master’s degree. Some practitioners continue their education for an additional two years to earn a doctorate in the field.

The World Health Organization recognizes that acupuncture is useful in a tremendous variety of diseases, from pain to gynecological disorders to respiratory problems and neurological conditions.

Partners, Dr. Henry McCann, DAOM, LAc, and Candace Sarges MAc, LAc, head the North Jersey Center for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine in Madison. Both are licensed to practice acupuncture and were among the first providers nationwide to be fully board certified in Oriental Medicine.

They graduated together from the New England School of Acupuncture, the oldest college of Oriental Medicine in the United States.

"Western medicine is beginning to acknowledge

the effectiveness of acupuncture..."

Ms. Sarges is president of the New Jersey Association for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, and in 2005, then Governor Richard Codey appointed Dr. McCann to sit on the New Jersey State Acupuncture Examining Board, of which he is currently president.

Choosing the right acupuncturist to meet your needs is like choosing the “right” doctor. Look up their credentials on the Internet and ask for patient referrals. Better yet, ask a friend who has been successfully helped by acupuncture. In New Jersey, qualified acupuncturists can be found by visiting the State association’s website, www.njaaom.org.

Western medicine is beginning to acknowledge the effectiveness of acupuncture as it’s being used more and more by hospitals and western physicians, alone or along with western treatment methods.

“For years, Dr. Ali Keshaverzian ignored ‘alternative therapies because his Western-trained brain wanted more evidence that they really worked. Ten years later, Keshaverian straddles both worlds, using Western treatments along with a variety of CAM – Complementary and Alternative Medicine (including acupuncture).” CHICAGO TRIBUNE, 1/14/09.


For centuries, the Chinese have used acupuncture and TCM to treat infertility.

One day when I was being treated at the North Jersey Center for Acupuncture, I was puzzled by the array of baby pictures – hundreds of them – so I asked Dr. McCann, half joking, whether they’re all pictures of his family.

“No,” he replied, amused. “They’re the result of our infertility treatments. Almost all their parents had gone to infertility clinics first and were treated unsuccessfully after spending tens of thousands of dollars.

“These photos are of babies that resulted from treatment with acupuncture and TCM after the parents turned to us for help.”

Dr. McCann specialized in women’s health while studying for his doctor’s degree, and had advanced training in traditional Chinese gynecology at the Chengdu University of Chinese Medicine in Sichuan Province, China.

“These photos are of babies that resulted from

treatment with acupuncture and TCM after

the parents turned to us for help.”

FAQs REGARDING ACUPUNCTURE

Q. HOW DO YOU DECIDE WHERE THE NEEDLES ARE PLACED?

A. Stimulation of specific areas affects the function of various organs. However, those organs may not be close to the body part that is giving you a problem. For example, if you are suffering from headaches, the acupuncturist may insert needles in your hands or feet. There are 365 specific acupuncture points on the body, as well as an unlimited number of non-specific points. An experienced acupuncturist uses a selection of body sites for each session.

Q. HOW SHOULD I DRESS?

A. Wear loose, comfortable clothing as the acupuncturist may need to access points on your arms, legs and torso.

Q. WILL INSURANCE COVER THE COST OF TREATMENT?

A. Many insurance companies, including some Blue Cross/Blue Shield plans, cover acupuncture. It depends on your specific plan and diagnosis. Check with your own insurance company to determine if your acupuncture treatments are reimbursable. Patients who have acupuncture coverage are usually required to fill out and submit their own forms, although this may vary from clinic to clinic.

Q. HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE TO GET RESULTS?

A. The longer a problem has existed, the longer it will probably take to fix. A typical course of treatment may require 8 to 12 treatments, the patient going 1-3 times per week, but this differs from patient to patient. During your first visit, your practitioner will discuss with you what he or she thinks will be necessary for your case. Your treatment may include Chinese herbal medicines, diet or even lifestyle changes in addition to regular acupuncture. [Ed.: Much of the information for this article is based on independent research as well as discussions with Dr. Henry McCann and Ms. Candace Sarges of North Jersey Center for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine located in Madison, NJ.]

Last modified onTuesday, 19 March 2013 15:52
Stephen Wilcox

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